NB Picks - Sci Fi for the Deep Thinker

Do you often find yourself contemplating the inevitiable rise of the automatons? The potential for colonization of other planets? Corruption in science leading to frightening outcomes in the future? 

If this sounds like you, than this list is your jam.  Elayna is our book buyer and an avid Sci Fi reader,  and this week she shared a few of her recommendations for sci fi reads that will give you plenty of food for thought, and possibly some good conversation topics at your next Philosopher's Guild meeting. 

Anathem Cover Image
$9.99
ISBN: 9780061474101
Availability: Not On Our Shelves, Warehouse ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Harper - August 25th, 2009

A #1 New York Times Bestseller, Anathem is perhaps the most brilliant literary invention to date from the incomparable Neal Stephenson, who rocked the world with Snow Crash, Cryptonomicon, and The Baroque Cycle.


Red Mars (Mars Trilogy #1) Cover Image
$8.99
ISBN: 9780553560732
Availability: Not On Our Shelves, Warehouse ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Spectra - October 1st, 1993

Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel • Discover the novel that launched one of science fiction’s most beloved, acclaimed, and awarded trilogies: Kim Stanley Robinson’s masterly near-future chronicle of interplanetary colonization.
 


I, Robot (The Robot Series #1) Cover Image
$17.00
ISBN: 9780553382563
Availability: Not On Our Shelves, Warehouse ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Del Rey - April 29th, 2008

This classic science fiction masterwork by Isaac Asimov weaves stories about robots, humanity, and the deep questions of existence into a novel of shocking intelligence and heart.
 
“A must-read for science-fiction buffs and literature enjoyers alike.”—The Guardian


Stories of Your Life and Others Cover Image
$16.95
ISBN: 9781101972120
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Vintage - June 14th, 2016

An award-winning book from the author of Exhalation, this short story collection “blend[s] absorbing storytelling with meditations on the universe, being, time and space. . . . raises questions about the nature of reality and what it is to be human.” —The New York Times